• Cocktail and Dinner Party Economics
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  • Dinner Party Economics

What People are Saying…

In Praise of Cocktail Party Economics

Cocktail Party Economics is a refreshing, easy to understand introduction to the arcane world of economics. Using an engaging, conversational style filled with many practical examples, the book does a great job explaining the concepts behind media coverage of economic and business events. I also enjoyed the lively descriptions of long-dead economists and how their ideas are relevant to our daily lives.

Warren Jestin, Chief Economist, Scotiabank

Cocktail Party Economics is a fun and quick read! I love the way it weaves together little things to explains big things. The flow of the stories and quotes, used to enliven the economics, feels like easy conversation. This is the easiest, and hence most “efficient”, introduction to economics I know.

Merwan H. Engineer, Full Professor of Economics, University of Victoria

I “really” enjoyed reading the book; it was pleasantly concise, entertaining due to Evie’s sarcastic & funny comments and personable stories, and really practical explanations of economic concepts.

Jacqueline Figueroa, Marketing student, University of Guelph

I think that her vision is carried out skillfully, in a manner which is actually quite entertaining. It makes the book very easy to read. I really enjoyed the anecdotes and the quotes (they are all GREAT!) as well as the examples that take the drudgery (for some…) out of studying Economics. I love how much I learned about society and history through this book and through all the real life tie-ins that bring economics into plain vision, making ideas understandable.

Lee Fridman, Management Economics and Finance student, University of Guelph

In Praise of Dinner Party Economics

As any good teacher will tell you, simplifying complex concepts is a real talent.  Making them fun is a genuine gift.  Dinner Party Economics does both.  Full of lively examples to engage and enthrall, this book will leave you hungry for more!

Christopher Ragan, Associate Professor, McGill University

David Dodge Chair in Monetary Policy, C.D.Howe Institute

 

Dinner Party Economics whets the appetite through fascinating biographies and quotes, clarifies some of the controversies involved, and sustains the commitment needed to become able to think more deeply about important economic problems.

Professor Louis N. Christofides,  Department of Economics, University of Cyprus

 
As someone who has a fear of numbers but an interest in economics, this book was indispensable in smoothing the gap between the two. I never thought I’d be able to learn macroeconomics in such a quick and painless way. I’m excited to go to my next dinner party!

Nathan Hooper,  First Year Political Science major, University of Guelph

 
Not all economics books have to be feared.  I’ve been seeking a ‘conversational’ economics book that is not too detailed and boring for a long time. Evie and Richard have nailed this format.

Professor of Economics Darren Chapman, Lawrence Kinlin School of Business, Fanshawe College

 
A very successful piece of de-mystifiation.  This book is an excellent starting point for someone who wants to get past the jargon and the shouting and get a handle on some fundamental economic issues.

Professor Brian Ferguson, Department of Economics, University of Guelph

Comments (16)

  • comment_avatar

    david kralt

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    Hello Mr. Maranta and Miss Adomait,

    I hope all is well. Congratulations on your book! I had the good fortune to attend the release ceremony yesterday. I plan on picking the book up this afternoon. I apologize if this email is not appropriate for the cocktail party economics website. I was wondering whether any non-economic thinkers affected your writing process at all? The reason I ask is that I find that while economics provides an understanding of the logic that is necessary for material success it doesn’t sufficiently explain the reasoning process that drives individual economic behaviour. For example, the desire or duty to provide for loved ones is a highly relevant variable for why people enter into a market and what information they seek once there. I realize that these ideas may note flow with purpose of the book, so perhaps the question should be rephrased to be more general: Which authors, ideas, intellectual movements, do you believe provide a good understanding of the non-quantitative (for lack of a better word) forces that move economic behaviour?

    Have a wonderful day and good luck with the book!
    David Kralt

    Reply

    • comment_avatar

      eadomait

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      Hi,
      Great question David! Because economics looks at both the monetary and non-monetary costs and benefits of any decision, our book definitely goes beyond the numbers in analysing markets. Here is an example in keeping with the spirit of the book. When I was a student I wanted to buy a fur coat but I knew this offend students in the animal rights movement. I decided against it. Obviously, it wasn’t just the monetary cost of the fur (there was a lovely mink coat I loved that cost about $10,000) that kept me from making a purchase. To economists, both costs are relevant.

      READING ECONOMICS
      “It is the business of economists, not to tell us what to do, but show why what we are doing anyway is in accord with proper principles.”
      Joan Robinson (1903-1983) British economist
      Taken from Economic Philosophy (1962)

      In addition to our book COCKTAIL PARTY ECONOMICS (which I think is a great first book in economics), I recommend Freakonomics which is the popularization of economist Steven Levitt’s research projects. Very little in that book is about typical markets. I would also recommend a book by Behavioural economist Dan Ariely called Predictably Irrational: The hidden forces that shape our decisions. I think it will give you what you are looking for.

      Reply

  • comment_avatar

    Evie Adomait

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    Economist think that costs and benefits are explicit numbers (ie wages and prices etc) as well as implicit valuations such as the ones you describe (desire and duty as well as altuism). Therefore, I included such topics as surrogacy, adoption and marriage markets in our book. A field you might enjoy exploring is Behavioural Economics. Along this vein, I will be blogging soon about Dan Ariely’s book Predictably Irrational.

    Reply

  • comment_avatar

    Jeannie Wolpert

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    Pretty nice post. I just stumbled upon your blog and wished to say that I have really enjoyed surfing around your blog posts. After all I will be subscribing to your feed and I hope you write again soon!

    Reply

    • comment_avatar

      Rick Maranta

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      Thanks so much. We keep trying to post relevant information about Economics on a regular basis. Thanks for joining us!

      Reply

  • comment_avatar

    Camilla Mongillo

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    The only way to address and correct this inequity, at least from a North American perspective (the Chinese have huge problems of their own), is to get people living within their means. We need to become less of a no-down-payment, no-interest, no payments until kingdom come culture to one that pays according to what it can afford, best made in cash or at least nearer to my grandfather’s idea of saving up for something you dearly want and don’t get it until you have earned and saved the money.

    Reply

  • comment_avatar

    Cleofe Villa Pina

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    Reply

    • comment_avatar

      Rick Maranta

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      Sure go ahead! Thanks for reading the Blog!

      Reply

  • comment_avatar

    Marget Klamm

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    As a Newbie, I am permanently searching online for articles that can aid me. Thank you

    Reply

  • comment_avatar

    local marketing articles

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    Reply

  • comment_avatar

    Julissa Emziah

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    Reply

    • comment_avatar

      Rick Maranta

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      Sure go ahead

      Reply

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